NH Worker’s Compensation Questions

Workers Compensation - Welts, White, & Fontaine

What do I do if I am hurt at work?

If you injure yourself at your place of employment, you must take the following action:

  • Report the injury to your supervisor
  • Seek medical attention immediately
  • Ask your physician to complete the NH Worker’s Compensation Medical Form and forward to the worker’s compensation insurance carrier
  • Follow your physician’s orders until you are released to return to work
  • Do not try to perform physical activities that your doctor advised against; you could injure yourself further and complicate your workers related case.

I have a WC claim, but I feel better. Do I still have to go to the doctors’ appointments?

You should attend each and every appointment with your doctor, physical therapist, etc.
Missing medical appointments is a sure way of losing your benefits. It is very important that you visit your doctor as often and for the duration he or she advises. Follow your doctor’s treatment instructions and do not stop seeing your doctor until you have been discharged from further treatment. The reasons are two-fold:

  • We want you to get better as quickly as possible
  • It is important to your case that a complete, continuous, and accurate record of your complaints and treatment is made by your attending physician.

Due to my work injury I have to attend physical therapy three (3) times a week. However, due to my reduced income I am finding that I do not have enough money/gas to get to these appointments. What should I do?

Keep a written log to track the dates of each and every visit to medical providers such as hospitals, doctors, physical therapist, etc., which result from your workers compensation injury; include the mileage to and from each visit. You are entitled to receive payment for mileage for those visits and should maintain a written compilation of the dates, names and addresses of the medical providers, and round-trip mileage for each visit. On a monthly basis, mail them to the insurance company requesting mileage reimbursement.

Why am I receiving a notice to attend an “IME” from the insurance carrier?

The insurance company normally schedules an “independent medical examination” for you with their doctor if you have been receiving workers compensation benefits for an extended period of time. You are required to attend such appointments, and the insurance company is allowed to request termination of your benefits if you do not attend. However, the insurance company can only schedule two (2) IME per year. Do not be fooled into believing that this is a second opinion for your benefit. You are entitled to obtain a second opinion from a doctor of your choosing.

What happens if my doctor tells me that I cannot return to work due to my permanent restrictions?

The Workers Compensation insurance company may hire a rehabilitation/vocational counselor to work with you to either

  • Obtain another position with the same employer that falls within your restrictions and approximates your average weekly wage
  • Obtain a similar position at another employer that falls within your restrictions and approximates your average weekly wage; or
  • Obtain another position at another company that can accommodate your restrictions and approximates your average weekly wage.

I don’t agree with the doctor my employer sent me to regarding my work injury. Do I have to get the carrier’s permission to get a second opinion?

You have the right to choose your own physician for injuries you incur at work. You also have the right to obtain a second opinion from a physician of your choice in addition to the Independent Medical Evaluation(s) requested by the workers’ compensation carrier.

For more information, please contact us to schedule a free consultation. We would be happy to assist and accommodate you in your time of need. (603) 883-0797

Michael Fontaine

This blog is intended for informational use only. The information contained herein should not be construed as offering legal advice or a legal opinion.